Label: STIVARGA- regorafenib monohydrate tablet, film coated

  • NDC Code(s): 50419-171-00, 50419-171-01, 50419-171-03, 50419-171-04
  • Packager: Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals Inc.
  • Category: HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG LABEL
  • DEA Schedule: None
  • Marketing Status: New Drug Application

Drug Label Information

Updated 09/14

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  • BOXED WARNING(What is this?)

    WARNING: HEPATOTOXICITY

    Severe and sometimes fatal hepatotoxicity has been observed in clinical trials [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].
    Monitor hepatic function prior to and during treatment [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].
    Interrupt and then reduce or discontinue Stivarga for hepatotoxicity as manifested by elevated liver function tests or hepatocellular necrosis, depending upon severity and persistence [see Dosage and Administration (2.2)].
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  • HIGHLIGHTS OF PRESCRIBING INFORMATION
    These highlights do not include all the information needed to use STIVARGA safely and effectively. See full prescribing information for STIVARGA.

    STIVARGA ® (regorafenib) tablets, for oral use
    Initial U.S. Approval: 2012

    WARNING: HEPATOTOXICITY

    See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning.

    Severe and sometimes fatal hepatotoxicity has been observed in clinical trials. (5.1)
    Monitor hepatic function prior to and during treatment. (5.1)
    Interrupt and then reduce or discontinue Stivarga for hepatotoxicity as manifested by elevated liver function tests or hepatocellular necrosis, depending upon severity and persistence. (2.2)

    RECENT MAJOR CHANGES

    Indications and Usage (1.2) 02/2013

    Warnings and Precautions (5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5) 02/2013

    INDICATIONS AND USAGE

    Stivarga is a kinase inhibitor indicated for the treatment of patients with:

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) who have been previously treated with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin- and irinotecan-based chemotherapy, an anti-VEGF therapy, and, if KRAS wild type, an anti-EGFR therapy. ( 1.1)
    Locally advanced, unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) who have been previously treated with imatinib mesylate and sunitinib malate. ( 1.2)

    DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

    Recommended Dose: 160 mg orally, once daily for the first 21 days of each 28-day cycle. ( 2.1)
    Take Stivarga with food (a low-fat breakfast). ( 2.1, 12.3)

    DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

    40 mg film-coated tablets (3)

    CONTRAINDICATIONS

    None. (4)

    WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

    Hemorrhage: Permanently discontinue Stivarga for severe or life-threatening hemorrhage. ( 5.2)
    Dermatological toxicity: Interrupt and then reduce or discontinue Stivarga depending on severity and persistence of dermatologic toxicity. ( 5.3)
    Hypertension: Temporarily or permanently discontinue Stivarga for severe or uncontrolled hypertension. ( 5.4)
    Cardiac ischemia and infarction: Withhold Stivarga for new or acute cardiac ischemia/infarction and resume only after resolution of acute ischemic events. ( 5.5)
    Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome (RPLS): Discontinue Stivarga. ( 5.6)
    Gastrointestinal perforation or fistulae: Discontinue Stivarga. ( 5.7)
    Wound healing complications: Stop Stivarga before surgery. Discontinue in patients with wound dehiscence. ( 5.8)
    Embryofetal toxicity: Can cause fetal harm. Advise women of potential risk to a fetus. ( 5.9, 8.1)

    ADVERSE REACTIONS

    The most common adverse reactions (≥20%) are asthenia/fatigue, HFSR, diarrhea, decreased appetite/food intake, hypertension, mucositis, dysphonia, and infection, pain (not otherwise specified), decreased weight, gastrointestinal and abdominal pain, rash, fever, and nausea. (6)

    To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals Inc. at 1-888-842-2937 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Strong CYP3A4 inducers: Avoid strong CYP3A4 inducers. ( 7.1)
    Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors: Avoid strong CYP3A4 inhibitors. ( 7.2)

    USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

    Nursing Mothers: Discontinue drug or nursing, taking into consideration the importance of the drug to the mother. (8.3)

    See 17 for PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION and FDA-approved patient labeling.

    Revised: 9/2014

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  • FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: CONTENTS*
  • 1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE

    1.1 Colorectal Cancer

    Stivarga® is indicated for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) who have been previously treated with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin- and irinotecan-based chemotherapy, an anti-VEGF therapy, and, if KRAS wild type, an anti-EGFR therapy.

    1.2 Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    Stivarga is indicated for the treatment of patients with locally advanced, unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) who have been previously treated with imatinib mesylate and sunitinib malate.

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  • 2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

    2.1 Recommended Dose

    The recommended dose is 160 mg regorafenib (four 40 mg tablets) taken orally once daily for the first 21 days of each 28-day cycle. Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.

    Take Stivarga at the same time each day. Swallow tablet whole with a low-fat breakfast that contains less than 30% fat [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Examples of a low-fat breakfast include 2 slices of white toast with 1 tablespoon of low-fat margarine and 1 tablespoon of jelly, and 8 ounces of skim milk (319 calories and 8.2 g fat); or 1 cup of cereal, 8 ounces of skim milk, 1 slice of toast with jam, apple juice, and 1 cup of coffee or tea (520 calories and 2 g fat). Do not take two doses of Stivarga on the same day to make up for a missed dose from the previous day.

    2.2 Dose Modifications

    Interrupt Stivarga for the following:

    NCI CTCAE Grade 2 hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) [palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia (PPE)] that is recurrent or does not improve within 7 days despite dose reduction; interrupt therapy for a minimum of 7 days for Grade 3 HFSR
    Symptomatic Grade 2 hypertension
    Any NCI CTCAE Grade 3 or 4 adverse reaction

    Reduce the dose of Stivarga to 120 mg:

    For the first occurrence of Grade 2 HFSR of any duration
    After recovery of any Grade 3 or 4 adverse reaction
    For Grade 3 aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation; only resume if the potential benefit outweighs the risk of hepatotoxicity

    Reduce the dose of Stivarga to 80 mg:

    For re-occurrence of Grade 2 HFSR at the 120 mg dose
    After recovery of any Grade 3 or 4 adverse reaction at the 120 mg dose (except hepatotoxicity)

    Discontinue Stivarga permanently for the following:

    Failure to tolerate 80 mg dose
    Any occurrence of AST or ALT more than 20 times the upper limit of normal (ULN)
    Any occurrence of AST or ALT more than 3 times ULN with concurrent bilirubin more than 2 times ULN
    Re-occurrence of AST or ALT more than 5 times ULN despite dose reduction to 120 mg
    For any Grade 4 adverse reaction; only resume if the potential benefit outweighs the risks
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  • 3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

    Stivarga is a 40 mg, light pink, oval shaped, film-coated tablet, debossed with ‘BAYER’ on one side and ‘40’ on the other side.

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  • 4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

    None

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  • 5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

    5.1 Hepatotoxicity

    Severe drug induced liver injury with fatal outcome occurred in 0.3% of 1200 Stivarga-treated patients across all clinical trials. Liver biopsy results, when available, showed hepatocyte necrosis with lymphocyte infiltration. In Study 1, fatal hepatic failure occurred in 1.6% of patients in the regorafenib arm and in 0.4% of patients in the placebo arm; all the patients with hepatic failure had metastatic disease in the liver. In Study 2, fatal hepatic failure occurred in 0.8% of patients in the regorafenib arm [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)].

    Obtain liver function tests (ALT, AST and bilirubin) before initiation of Stivarga and monitor at least every two weeks during the first 2 months of treatment. Thereafter, monitor monthly or more frequently as clinically indicated. Monitor liver function tests weekly in patients experiencing elevated liver function tests until improvement to less than 3 times the ULN or baseline.

    Temporarily hold and then reduce or permanently discontinue Stivarga depending on the severity and persistence of hepatotoxicity as manifested by elevated liver function tests or hepatocellular necrosis [see Dosage and Administration (2.2)].

    5.2 Hemorrhage

    Stivarga caused an increased incidence of hemorrhage. The overall incidence (Grades 1-5) was 21% and 11% in Stivarga-treated patients compared to 8% and 3% in placebo-treated patients in Studies 1 and 2. Fatal hemorrhage occurred in 4 of 632 (0.6%) of Stivarga-treated patients in Studies 1 and 2 and involved the respiratory, gastrointestinal, or genitourinary tracts.

    Permanently discontinue Stivarga in patients with severe or life-threatening hemorrhage. Monitor INR levels more frequently in patients receiving warfarin [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

    5.3 Dermatological Toxicity

    Stivarga caused increased incidences of adverse reactions involving the skin and subcutaneous tissues (72% versus 24% in Study 1 and 78% versus 24% in Study 2), including hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) also known as palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia (PPE), and severe rash requiring dose modification.

    The overall incidence of HFSR was higher in Stivarga-treated patients, (45% versus 7% in Study 1 and 67% versus 12% in Study 2), than in the placebo-treated patients. Most cases of HFSR in Stivarga-treated patients appeared during the first cycle of treatment (69% and 71% of patients who developed HFSR in Study 1 and Study 2, respectively). The incidence of Grade 3 HFSR (17% versus 0% in Study 1 and 22% versus 0% in Study 2), Grade 3 rash (6% versus <1% in Study 1 and 7% versus 0% in Study 2), serious adverse reactions of erythema multiforme (0.2% vs. 0% in Study 1) and Stevens Johnson Syndrome (0.2% vs. 0% in Study 1) was higher in Stivarga-treated patients [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)].

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis occurred in 0.17% of 1200 Stivarga-treated patients across all clinical trials.

    Withhold Stivarga, reduce the dose, or permanently discontinue Stivarga depending on the severity and persistence of dermatologic toxicity [see Dosage and Administration (2.2)]. Institute supportive measures for symptomatic relief.

    5.4 Hypertension

    Stivarga caused an increased incidence of hypertension (30% versus 8% in Study 1 and 59% versus 27% in Study 2) [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. Hypertensive crisis occurred in 0.25% of 1200 Stivarga-treated patients across all clinical trials. The onset of hypertension occurred during the first cycle of treatment in most patients who developed hypertension (72% in Study 1 and Study 2).

    Do not initiate Stivarga unless blood pressure is adequately controlled. Monitor blood pressure weekly for the first 6 weeks of treatment and then every cycle, or more frequently, as clinically indicated. Temporarily or permanently withhold Stivarga for severe or uncontrolled hypertension [see Dosage and Administration (2.2)].

    5.5 Cardiac Ischemia and Infarction

    Stivarga increased the incidence of myocardial ischemia and infarction in Study 1 (1.2% versus 0.4%) [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. Withhold Stivarga in patients who develop new or acute onset cardiac ischemia or infarction. Resume Stivarga only after resolution of acute cardiac ischemic events, if the potential benefits outweigh the risks of further cardiac ischemia.

    5.6 Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome (RPLS)

    Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome (RPLS), a syndrome of subcortical vasogenic edema diagnosed by characteristic finding on MRI, occurred in one of 1200 Stivarga-treated patients across all clinical trials. Perform an evaluation for RPLS in any patient presenting with seizures, headache, visual disturbances, confusion or altered mental function. Discontinue Stivarga in patients who develop RPLS.

    5.7 Gastrointestinal Perforation or Fistula

    Gastrointestinal perforation or fistula occurred in 0.6% of 1200 patients treated with Stivarga across all clinical trials; this included four fatal events. In Study 2, 2.1 % (4/188) of Stivarga-treated patients who were treated during the blinded or open-label portion of the study developed gastrointestinal fistula or perforation; of these, two cases of gastrointestinal perforation were fatal. Permanently discontinue Stivarga in patients who develop gastrointestinal perforation or fistula.

    5.8 Wound Healing Complications

    No formal studies of the effect of regorafenib on wound healing have been conducted. Since vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) inhibitors such as regorafenib can impair wound healing, treatment with regorafenib should be stopped at least 2 weeks prior to scheduled surgery. The decision to resume regorafenib after surgery should be based on clinical judgment of adequate wound healing. Regorafenib should be discontinued in patients with wound dehiscence.

    5.9 Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

    Stivarga can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Regorafenib was embryolethal and teratogenic in rats and rabbits at exposures lower than human exposures at the recommended dose, with increased incidences of cardiovascular, genitourinary, and skeletal malformations. If this drug is used during pregnancy, or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to a fetus [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1)].

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  • 6 ADVERSE REACTIONS

    The following serious adverse reactions are discussed elsewhere in the labeling:

    Hepatotoxicity [See Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]
    Hemorrhage [See Warnings and Precautions ( 5.2 )]
    Dermatological Toxicity [See Warnings and Precautions ( 5.3 )]
    Hypertension [See Warnings and Precautions (5.4)]
    Cardiac Ischemia and Infarction [See Warnings and Precautions ( 5.5 )]
    Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome (RPLS) [See Warnings and Precautions ( 5.6 )]
    Gastrointestinal Perforation or Fistula [See Warnings and Precautions ( 5.7 )]

    Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rate observed in practice.

    The most frequently observed adverse drug reactions (≥20%) in patients receiving Stivarga are asthenia/fatigue, HFSR, diarrhea, decreased appetite/food intake, hypertension, mucositis, dysphonia, infection, pain (not otherwise specified), decreased weight, gastrointestinal and abdominal pain, rash, fever, and nausea.

    The most serious adverse drug reactions in patients receiving Stivarga are hepatotoxicity, hemorrhage, and gastrointestinal perforation.

    6.1 Clinical Trials Experience

    Colorectal Cancer

    The safety data described below, except where noted, are derived from a randomized (2:1), double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (Study 1) in which 500 patients (median age 61 years; 61% men) with previously treated metastatic colorectal cancer received Stivarga as a single agent at the dose of 160 mg daily for the first 3 weeks of each 4 week treatment cycle and 253 patients (median age 61 years; 60% men) received placebo. The median duration of therapy was 7.3 (range 0.3, 47.0) weeks for patients receiving Stivarga. Due to adverse reactions, 61% of the patients receiving Stivarga required a dose interruption and 38% of the patients had their dose reduced. Drug-related adverse reactions that resulted in treatment discontinuation were reported in 8.2% of Stivarga-treated patients compared to 1.2% of patients who received placebo. Hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) and rash were the most common reasons for permanent discontinuation of Stivarga.

    Table 1 compares the incidence of adverse reactions (≥10%) in patients receiving Stivarga and reported more commonly than in patients receiving placebo (Study 1).

    Table 1 Adverse drug reactions (≥10%) reported in patients treated with Stivarga in Study 1 and reported more commonly than in patients receiving placebo

    Adverse Reactions
    Stivarga
    (N=500)
    Placebo
    (N=253)
    Grade Grade
    All
    %
    ≥ 3
    %
    All
    %
    ≥ 3
    %
    *
    The term rash represents reports of events of drug eruption, rash, erythematous rash, generalized rash, macular rash, maculo-papular rash, papular rash, and pruritic rash.
    Fatal outcomes observed.

    General disorders and administration site conditions

     
    Asthenia/fatigue
     
    Pain

    Fever

     
    64
     
    29
     
    28
     
    15
     
    3
     
    2

    46

    21

    15

    9

    2

    0

    Metabolism and nutrition disorders

    Decreased appetite and food intake

    47

    5

    28

    4

    Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders

    HFSR/PPE

    Rash *

    45

    26

    17

    6

    7

    4

    0

    <1

    Gastrointestinal disorders

    Diarrhea

    Mucositis

    43

    33

    8

    4

    17

    5

    2

    0

    Investigations

    Weight loss

    32

    <1

    10

    0

    Infections and infestations

    Infection

    31

    9

    17

    6

    Vascular disorders

    Hypertension

    Hemorrhage

    30

    21

    8

    2

    8

    8

    <1

    <1

    Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders

    Dysphonia

    30

    0

    6

    0

    Nervous system disorders

    Headache

    10

    <1

    7

    0


    Laboratory Abnormalities

    Laboratory abnormalities observed in Study 1 are shown in Table 2.

    Table 2 Laboratory test abnormalities reported in Study 1
    Laboratory Parameter Stivarga
    (N=500 *)
    Placebo
    (N=253 *)
    Grade Grade
    All
    %
    3
    %
    4
    %
    All
    %
    3
    %
    4
    %
    *
    % based on number of patients with post-baseline samples which may be less than 500 (regorafenib) or 253 (placebo).
    Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), v3.0.
    International normalized ratio: No Grade 4 denoted in CTCAE, v3.0.

    Blood and lymphatic system disorders

    Anemia

    79

    5

    1

    66

    3

    0

    Thrombocytopenia

    41

    2

    <1

    17

    <1

    0

    Neutropenia

    3

    1

    0

    0

    0

    0

     
    Lymphopenia

    54

    9

    0

    34

    3

    0

    Metabolism and nutrition disorders

    Hypocalcemia

    59

    1

    <1

    18

    1

    0

    Hypokalemia

    26

    4

    0

    8

    <1

    0

    Hyponatremia

    30

    7

    1

    22

    4

    0

    Hypophosphatemia

    57

    31

    1

    11

    4

    0

    Hepatobiliary disorders

    Hyperbilirubinemia

    45

    10

    3

    17

    5

    3

    Increased AST

    65

    5

    1

    46

    4

    1

    Increased ALT

    45

    5

    1

    30

    3

    <1

    Renal and urinary disorders

    Proteinuria

    60

    <1

    0

    34

    <1

     
    0

    Investigations

    Increased INR

    24

    4

    N/A

    17

    2

    N/A

    Increased Lipase

    46

    9

    2

    19

    3

    2

    Increased Amylase

    26

    2

    <1

    17

    2

    <1

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    The safety data described below are derived from a randomized (2:1), double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (Study 2) in which 132 patients (median age 60 years; 64% men) with previously treated GIST received Stivarga as a single agent at a dose of 160 mg daily for the first 3 weeks of each 4 week treatment cycle and 66 patients (median age 61 years; 64% men) received placebo. The median duration of therapy was 22.9 (range 0.1, 50.9) weeks for patients receiving Stivarga. Dose interruptions for adverse events were required in 58% of patients receiving Stivarga and 50% of patients had their dose reduced. Drug-related adverse reactions that resulted in treatment discontinuation were reported in 2.3% of Stivarga-treated patients compared to 1.5% of patients who received placebo.

    Table 3 compares the incidence of adverse reactions (≥10%) in GIST patients receiving Stivarga and reported more commonly than in patients receiving placebo (Study 2).

    Table 3 Adverse reactions (≥10%) reported in patients treated with Stivarga in Study 2 and reported more commonly than in patients receiving placebo
    Adverse Reactions Stivarga
    (N=132)
    Placebo
    (N=66)
    Grade Grade
    All
    %
    ≥ 3
    %
    All
    %
    ≥ 3
    %
    *
    The term rash represents reports of events of rash, erythematous rash, macular rash, maculo-papular rash, papular rash and pruritic rash.
    Hypothyroidism incidence based on subset of patients with normal TSH and no thyroid supplementation at baseline.
     
    Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders
     
    HFSR/PPE
     
    Rash *
     
    Alopecia

    67

    30

    24

    22

    7

    2

    15

    3

    2

    2

    0

    0

     
    General disorders and administration site conditions
     
    Asthenia/Fatigue
     
    Fever

    52

    21

    4

    0

    39

    11

    2

    2

     
    Vascular disorders
     
    Hypertension
     
    Hemorrhage

    59

    11

    28

    4

    27

    3

    5

    0

     
    Gastrointestinal disorders
     
    Diarrhea
     
    Mucositis
     
    Nausea
     
    Vomiting

    47

    40

    20

    17

    8

    2

    2

    <1

    9

    8

    12

    8

    0

    2

    2

    0

     
    Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders
     
    Dysphonia

    39

    0

    9

    0

     
    Infections and infestations
     
    Infection
     
    32
     
    5
     
    5
     
    0
     
    Metabolism and nutrition disorders
     
    Decreased appetite and food intake
     
    Hypothyroidism

    31

    18

    <1

    0

    21

    6

    3

    0

     
    Nervous system disorders
     
    Headache

    16

    0

    9

    0

     
    Investigations
     
    Weight loss

    14

    0

    8

    0

     
    Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders
     
    Musculoskeletal stiffness

    14

    0

    3

    0

    Laboratory abnormalities observed in Study 2 are shown in Table 4.

    Table 4 Laboratory test abnormalities reported in Study 2
    Laboratory Parameter Stivarga
    (N=132*)
    Placebo
    (N=66 *)
    Grade Grade
    All
    %
    3
    %
    4
    %
    All
    %
    3
    %
    4
    %
    *
    % based on number of patients with post-baseline samples which may be less than 132 (regorafenib) or 66 (placebo).
    CTCAE, v4.0.
    No Grade 4 denoted in CTCAE, v4.0.

    Blood and lymphatic system disorders

    Thrombocytopenia

    Neutropenia

    Lymphopenia

    13

    16

    30

    1

    2

    8

    0

    0

    0

    2

    12

    24

    0

    3

    3

    2

    0

    0

    Metabolism and nutrition disorders

    Hypocalcemia

    Hypokalemia

    Hypophosphatemia

    17

    21

    55

    2

    3

    20

    0

    0

    2

    5

    3

    3

    0

    0

    2

    0

    0

    0

    Hepatobiliary disorders

    Hyperbilirubinemia

    Increased AST

    Increased ALT

    33

    58

    39

    3

    3

    4

    1

    1

    1

    12

    47

    39

    2

    3

    2

    0

    0

    0

    Renal and urinary disorders

    Proteinuria

    33

    3

    -

    30

    3

    -

    Investigations

    Increased Lipase

    14

    0

    1

    5

    0

    0

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  • 7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

    7.1 Effect of Strong CYP3A4 Inducers on Regorafenib

    Co-administration of a strong CYP3A4 inducer (rifampin) with a single 160 mg dose of Stivarga decreased the mean exposure of regorafenib, increased the mean exposure of the active metabolite M-5, and resulted in no change in the mean exposure of the active metabolite M-2. Avoid concomitant use of Stivarga with strong CYP3A4 inducers (e.g. rifampin, phenytoin, carbamazepine, phenobarbital, and St. John’s Wort) [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

    7.2 Effect of Strong CYP3A4 Inhibitors on Regorafenib

    Co-administration of a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor (ketoconazole) with a single 160 mg dose of Stivarga increased the mean exposure of regorafenib and decreased the mean exposure of the active metabolites M-2 and M-5. Avoid concomitant use of Stivarga with strong inhibitors of CYP3A4 activity (e.g. clarithromycin, grapefruit juice, itraconazole, ketoconazole, nefazadone, posaconazole, telithromycin, and voriconazole) [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

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  • 8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

    8.1 Pregnancy

    Pregnancy Category D [see Warnings and Precautions (5.9)]

    Risk Summary

    Based on its mechanism of action, Stivarga can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies with Stivarga in pregnant women. Regorafenib was embryolethal and teratogenic in rats and rabbits at exposures lower than human exposures at the recommended dose, with increased incidences of cardiovascular, genitourinary, and skeletal malformations. If this drug is used during pregnancy or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to a fetus.

    Animal Data

    In embryo-fetal development studies, a total loss of pregnancy (100% resorption of litter) was observed in rats at doses as low as 1 mg/kg (approximately 6% of the recommended human dose, based on body surface area) and in rabbits at doses as low as 1.6 mg/kg (approximately 25% of the human exposure at the clinically recommended dose measured by AUC).

    In a single dose distribution study in pregnant rats, there was increased penetration of regorafenib across the blood-brain barrier in fetuses compared to dams. In a repeat dose study with daily administration of regorafenib to pregnant rats during organogenesis, findings included delayed ossification in fetuses at doses > 0.8 mg/kg (approximately 5% of the recommended human dose based on body surface area) with dose-dependent increases in skeletal malformations including cleft palate and enlarged fontanelle at doses ≥ 1 mg/kg (approximately 10% of the clinical exposure based on AUC). At doses ≥ 1.6 mg/kg (approximately 11% of the recommended human dose based on body surface area), there were dose-dependent increases in the incidence of cardiovascular malformations, external abnormalities, diaphragmatic hernia, and dilation of the renal pelvis.

    In pregnant rabbits administered regorafenib daily during organogenesis, there were findings of ventricular septal defects evident at the lowest tested dose of 0.4 mg/kg (approximately 7% of the AUC in patients at the recommended dose). At doses of ≥ 0.8 mg/kg (approximately 15% of the human exposure at the recommended human dose based on AUC), administration of regorafenib resulted in dose-dependent increases in the incidence of additional cardiovascular malformations and skeletal anomalies as well as significant adverse effects on the urinary system including missing kidney/ureter; small, deformed and malpositioned kidney; and hydronephrosis. The proportion of viable fetuses that were male decreased with increasing dose in two rabbit embryo-fetal toxicity studies.

    8.3 Nursing Mothers

    It is unknown whether regorafenib or its metabolites are excreted in human milk. In rats, regorafenib and its metabolites are excreted in milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk and because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from Stivarga, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

    8.4 Pediatric Use

    The safety and efficacy of Stivarga in pediatric patients less than 18 years of age have not been established.

    In 28-day repeat dose studies in rats there were dose-dependent findings of dentin alteration and angiectasis. These findings were observed at regorafenib doses as low as 4 mg/kg (approximately 25% of the AUC in humans at the recommended dose). In 13-week repeat dose studies in dogs there were similar findings of dentin alteration at doses as low as 20 mg/kg (approximately 43% of the AUC in humans at the recommended dose). Administration of regorafenib in these animals also led to persistent growth and thickening of the femoral epiphyseal growth plate.

    8.5 Geriatric Use

    Of the 632 Stivarga-treated patients enrolled in Studies 1 and 2, 37% were 65 years of age or older and over, while 8% were 75 and over. No overall differences in safety or efficacy were observed between these patients and younger patients.

    8.6 Hepatic Impairment

    No clinically important differences in the mean exposure of regorafenib or the active metabolites M-2 and M-5 were observed in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and mild (Child-Pugh A) or moderate (Child-Pugh B) hepatic impairment compared to patients with normal hepatic function [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. No dose adjustment is recommended in patients with mild or moderate hepatic impairment. Closely monitor patients with hepatic impairment for adverse reactions [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].

    Stivarga is not recommended for use in patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class C), as it has not been studied in this population.

    8.7 Renal Impairment

    No clinically relevant differences in the mean exposure of regorafenib and the active metabolites M-2 and M-5 were observed in patients with mild renal impairment (CLcr 60-89 mL/min) compared to patients with normal renal function following regorafenib 160 mg daily for 21 days [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. No dose adjustment is recommended for patients with mild renal impairment. Limited pharmacokinetic data are available from patients with moderate renal impairment (CLcr 30-59 mL/min). Stivarga has not been studied in patients with severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease.

    8.8 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

    Contraception

    Use effective contraception during treatment and up to 2 months after completion of therapy.

    Infertility

    There are no data on the effect of Stivarga on human fertility. Results from animal studies indicate that regorafenib can impair male and female fertility [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)].

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  • 10 OVERDOSAGE

    The highest dose of Stivarga studied clinically is 220 mg per day. In the event of suspected overdose, interrupt Stivarga, institute supportive care, and observe until clinical stabilization.

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  • 11 DESCRIPTION

    Stivarga (regorafenib) has the chemical name 4-[4-({[4-chloro-3-(trifluoromethyl) phenyl] carbamoyl} amino)-3-fluorophenoxy]-N-methylpyridine-2-carboxamide monohydrate. Regorafenib has the following structural formula:

    Stivarga Chemical Structure

    Regorafenib is a monohydrate and it has a molecular formula C21H15ClF4N4O3 • H2O and a molecular weight of 500.83. Regorafenib is practically insoluble in water, slightly soluble in acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol, and ethyl acetate and sparingly soluble in acetone.

    Stivarga tablets for oral administration are formulated as light pink oval shaped tablets debossed with "BAYER" on one side and "40" on the other. Each tablet contains 40 mg of regorafenib in the anhydrous state, which corresponds to 41.49 mg of regorafenib monohydrate, and the following inactive ingredients: cellulose microcrystalline, croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate, povidone, and colloidal silicon dioxide. The film-coating contains the following inactive ingredients: ferric oxide red, ferric oxide yellow, lecithin (soy), polyethylene glycol 3350, polyvinyl alcohol, talc, and titanium dioxide.

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  • 12 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

    12.1 Mechanism of Action

    Regorafenib is a small molecule inhibitor of multiple membrane-bound and intracellular kinases involved in normal cellular functions and in pathologic processes such as oncogenesis, tumor angiogenesis, and maintenance of the tumor microenvironment. In in vitro biochemical or cellular assays, regorafenib or its major human active metabolites M-2 and M-5 inhibited the activity of RET, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, KIT, PDGFR-alpha, PDGFR-beta, FGFR1, FGFR2, TIE2, DDR2, TrkA, Eph2A, RAF-1, BRAF, BRAFV600E , SAPK2, PTK5, and Abl at concentrations of regorafenib that have been achieved clinically. In in vivo models, regorafenib demonstrated anti-angiogenic activity in a rat tumor model, and inhibition of tumor growth as well as anti-metastatic activity in several mouse xenograft models including some for human colorectal carcinoma.

    12.3 Pharmacokinetics

    Absorption

    Following a single 160 mg dose of Stivarga in patients with advanced solid tumors, regorafenib reaches a geometric mean peak plasma level (Cmax) of 2.5 µg/mL at a median time of 4 hours and a geometric mean area under the plasma concentration vs. time curve (AUC) of 70.4 µg*h/mL. The AUC of regorafenib at steady-state increases less than dose proportionally at doses greater than 60 mg. At steady-state, regorafenib reaches a geometric mean Cmax of 3.9 µg/mL and a geometric mean AUC of 58.3 µg*h/mL. The coefficient of variation of AUC and Cmax is between 35% and 44%.

    The mean relative bioavailability of tablets compared to an oral solution is 69% to 83%.

    In a food-effect study, 24 healthy men received a single 160 mg dose of Stivarga on three separate occasions: under a fasted state, with a high-fat meal and with a low-fat meal. A high-fat meal (945 calories and 54.6 g fat) increased the mean AUC of regorafenib by 48% and decreased the mean AUC of the M-2 and M-5 metabolites by 20% and 51%, respectively, as compared to the fasted state. A low-fat meal (319 calories and 8.2 g fat) increased the mean AUC of regorafenib, M-2 and M-5 by 36%, 40% and 23%, respectively as compared to fasted conditions. Stivarga was administered with a low-fat meal in Studies 1 and 2 [see Dosage and Administration (2.1), Clinical Studies (14)].

    Distribution

    Regorafenib undergoes enterohepatic circulation with multiple plasma concentration peaks observed across the 24-hour dosing interval. Regorafenib is highly bound (99.5%) to human plasma proteins.

    Metabolism

    Regorafenib is metabolized by CYP3A4 and UGT1A9. The main circulating metabolites of regorafenib measured at steady-state in human plasma are M-2 (N-oxide) and M-5 (N-oxide and N-desmethyl), both of them having similar in vitro pharmacological activity and steady-state concentrations as regorafenib. M-2 and M-5 are highly protein bound (99.8% and 99.95%, respectively).

    Elimination

    Following a single 160 mg oral dose of Stivarga, the geometric mean (range) elimination half-lives for regorafenib and the M-2 metabolite in plasma are 28 hours (14 to 58 hours) and 25 hours (14 to 32 hours), respectively. M-5 has a longer mean (range) elimination half-life of 51 hours (32 to 70 hours).

    Approximately 71% of a radiolabeled dose was excreted in feces (47% as parent compound, 24% as metabolites) and 19% of the dose was excreted in urine (17% as glucuronides) within 12 days after administration of a radiolabeled oral solution at a dose of 120 mg.

    Age, Gender, and Weight

    Based on the population pharmacokinetic analysis, there is no clinically relevant effect of age, gender or weight on the pharmacokinetics of regorafenib.

    Hepatic Impairment

    The pharmacokinetics of regorafenib, M-2, and M-5 was evaluated in 14 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and mild hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh A); 4 patients with HCC and moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh B); and 10 patients with solid tumors and normal hepatic function after the administration of a single 100 mg dose of Stivarga. No clinically important differences in the mean exposure of regorafenib, M-2, or M-5 were observed in patients with mild or moderate hepatic impairment compared to the patients with normal hepatic function. The pharmacokinetics of regorafenib has not been studied in patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh C).

    Renal Impairment

    The pharmacokinetics of regorafenib, M-2, and M-5 was evaluated in 10 patients with mild renal impairment (CLcr 60-89 mL/min) and 18 patients with normal renal function following the administration of Stivarga at a dose of 160 mg daily for 21 days. No differences in the mean steady-state exposure of regorafenib, M-2, or M-5 were observed in patients with mild renal impairment compared to patients with normal renal function. Limited pharmacokinetic data are available from patients with moderate renal impairment (CLcr 30-59 mL/min). The pharmacokinetics of regorafenib has not been studied in patients with severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease.

    Drug-Drug Interactions

    Effect of Regorafenib on Cytochrome P450 Substrates: In vitro studies suggested that regorafenib is an inhibitor of CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2B6, CYP3A4 and CYP2C19; M-2 metabolite is an inhibitor of CYP2C9, CYP2C8, CYP3A4 and CYP2D6, and M-5 metabolite is an inhibitor of CYP2C8. In vitro studies suggested that regorafenib is not an inducer of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4 enzyme activity.

    Patients with advanced solid tumors received single oral doses of CYP substrates, 2 mg of midazolam (CYP3A4), 40 mg of omeprazole (CYP2C19) and 10 mg of warfarin (CYP2C9) or 4 mg of rosiglitazone (CYP2C8) one week before and two weeks after Stivarga at a dose of 160 mg once daily. No clinically relevant change was observed in the mean AUC of rosiglitazone (N=12) or the mean omeprazole (N=11) plasma concentrations measured 6 hours after dosing or the mean AUC of midazolam (N=15). The mean AUC of warfarin (N=8) increased by 25% [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)].

    Effect of CYP3A4 Strong Inducers on Regorafenib: Twenty-two healthy men received a single 160 mg dose of Stivarga alone and then 7 days after starting rifampin. Rifampin, a strong CYP3A4 inducer, was administered at a dose of 600 mg daily for 9 days. The mean AUC of regorafenib decreased by 50% and mean AUC of M-5 increased by 264%. No change in the mean AUC of M-2 was observed [see Drug Interactions (7.1)].

    Effect of CYP3A4 Strong Inhibitors on Regorafenib: Eighteen healthy men received a single 160 mg dose of Stivarga alone and then 5 days after starting ketoconazole. Ketoconazole, a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor, was administered at a dose of 400 mg daily for 18 days. The mean AUC of regorafenib increased by 33% and the mean AUC of M-2 and M-5 both decreased by 93% [see Drug Interactions (7.2)].

    Effect of Regorafenib on UGT1A1 Substrates: In vitro studies showed that regorafenib, M-2, and M-5 competitively inhibit UGT1A9 and UGT1A1 at therapeutically relevant concentrations. Eleven patients received irinotecan-containing combination chemotherapy with Stivarga at a dose of 160 mg. The mean AUC of irinotecan increased 28% and the mean AUC of SN-38 increased by 44% when irinotecan was administered 5 days after the last of 7 daily doses of Stivarga.

    In vitro screening of transporters: In vitro data suggested that regorafenib is an inhibitor of ABCG2 (Breast Cancer Resistance Protein) and ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein).

    12.6 Cardiac Electrophysiology

    The effect of multiple doses of Stivarga (160 mg once daily for 21 days) on the QTc interval was evaluated in an open label, single arm study in 25 patients with advanced solid tumors. No large changes in the mean QTc interval (i.e., > 20 msec) were detected in the study.

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  • 13 NONCLINICAL TOXICOLOGY

    13.1 Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

    Studies examining the carcinogenic potential of regorafenib have not been conducted. Regorafenib itself did not demonstrate genotoxicity in in vitro or in vivo assays; however, a major human active metabolite of regorafenib, (M-2), was positive for clastogenicity, causing chromosome aberration in Chinese hamster V79 cells.

    Dedicated studies to examine the effects of regorafenib on fertility have not been conducted; however, there were histological findings of tubular atrophy and degeneration in the testes, atrophy in the seminal vesicle, and cellular debris and oligospermia in the epididymides in male rats at doses similar to those in human at the clinical recommended dose based on AUC. In female rats, there were increased findings of necrotic corpora lutea in the ovaries at the same exposures. There were similar findings in dogs of both sexes in repeat dose studies at exposures approximately 83% of the human exposure at the recommended human dose based on AUC. These findings suggest that regorafenib may adversely affect fertility in humans.

    13.2 Animal Toxicology and/or Pharmacology

    In a chronic 26 week repeat dose study in rats there was a dose-dependent increase in the finding of thickening of the atrioventricular valve. At a dose that resulted in an exposure of approximately 12% of the human exposure at the recommended dose, this finding was present in half of the examined animals.

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  • 14 CLINICAL STUDIES

    14.1 Colorectal Cancer

    The clinical efficacy and safety of Stivarga were evaluated in an international, multi-center, randomized (2:1), double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (Study 1) in 760 patients with previously treated metastatic colorectal cancer. The major efficacy outcome measure was overall survival (OS); supportive efficacy outcome measures included progression-free survival (PFS) and objective tumor response rate.

    Patients were randomized to receive 160 mg regorafenib orally once daily (N=505) plus Best Supportive Care (BSC) or placebo (N=255) plus BSC for the first 21 days of each 28-day cycle. Stivarga was administered with a low-fat breakfast that contains less than 30% fat [see Dosage and Administration (2.1), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Treatment continued until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.

    In the all-randomized population, median age was 61 years, 61% were men, 78% were White, and all patients had baseline ECOG performance status of 0 or 1. The primary site of disease was colon (65%), rectum (29%), or both (6%). History of KRAS evaluation was reported for 729 (96%) patients; 430 (59%) of these patients were reported to have KRAS mutation. The median number of prior lines of therapy for metastatic disease was 3. All patients received prior treatment with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-based chemotherapy, and with bevacizumab. All but one patient with KRAS mutation-negative tumors received panitumumab or cetuximab.

    The addition of Stivarga to BSC resulted in a statistically significant improvement in survival compared to placebo plus BSC (see Table 5 and Figure 1).

    Table 5 Efficacy Results from Study 1
    *
    Stratified by geographic region and time from diagnosis of metastatic disease.
    Crossed the O’Brien-Fleming boundary (two-sided p-value < 0.018) at second interim analysis.

    Stivarga

    (N=505)

    Placebo

    (N=255)

    Overall Survival

    Number of deaths, N (%)

    275 (55%)

    157 (62%)

     
    Median Overall Survival (months)

    6.4

    5.0

     
    95% CI

    (5.8, 7.3)

    (4.4, 5.8)

     
    HR (95% CI)

    0.77 (0.64, 0.94)

     
    Stratified Log-Rank Test P-value *,

    0.0102

    Progression-free Survival

    Number of Death or Progression, N (%)

    417 (83%)

    231 (91%)

     
    Median Progression-free Survival (months)

    2.0

    1.7

     
    95% CI

    (1.9, 2.3)

    (1.7, 1.8)

     
    HR (95% CI)

    0.49 (0.42, 0.58)

     
    Stratified Log-Rank Test P-value *

    <0.0001

    Overall Response Rate

     
    Overall response, N (%)

    5 (1%)

    1 (0.4%)

     
    95% CI

    0.3%, 2.3%

    0%, 2.2%

    Figure 1 Kaplan-Meier Curves of Overall Survival

    Figure 1 Kaplan-Meier

    14.2 Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    The efficacy and safety of Stivarga were evaluated in an international, multi-center, randomized (2:1), double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (Study 2) in 199 patients with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), who had been previously treated with imatinib mesylate and sunitinib malate. Randomization was stratified by line of therapy (third vs. four or more) and geographic region (Asia vs. rest of the world).

    The major efficacy outcome measure of Study 2 was progression-free survival (PFS) based on disease assessment by independent radiological review using modified RECIST 1.1 criteria, in which lymph nodes and bone lesions were not target lesions and progressively growing new tumor nodule within a pre-existing tumor mass was progression. The key secondary outcome measure was overall survival.

    Patients were randomized to receive 160 mg regorafenib orally once daily (N=133) plus best supportive care (BSC) or placebo (N=66) plus BSC for the first 21 days of each 28-day cycle. Treatment continued until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. In Study 2, the median age of patients was 60 years, 64% were men, 68% were White, and all patients had baseline ECOG performance status of 0 (55%) or 1 (45%). At the time of disease progression as assessed by central review, the study blind was broken and all patients were offered the opportunity to take Stivarga at the investigator’s discretion. Fifty-six (85%) patients randomized to placebo and 41 (31%) patients randomized to Stivarga received open-label Stivarga.

    A statistically significant improvement in PFS was demonstrated among patients treated with Stivarga compared to placebo (see Table 6 and Figure 2). There was no statistically significant difference in overall survival at the time of the planned interim analysis based on 29% of the total events for the final analysis.

    Table 6 Efficacy Results for Study 2
    *
    Stratified by line of treatment and geographical region
    NR: Not Reached.

    Stivarga

    (N=133)

    Placebo

    (N=66)

    Progression-free Survival

    Number of Death or Progression, N (%)

    82 (62%)

    63 (96%)

    Median Progression-free Survival (months)

    4.8

    0.9

    95% CI

    (3.9, 5.7)

    (0.9, 1.1)

    HR (95% CI)

    0.27 (0.19, 0.39)

    Stratified Log-Rank Test P-value*

    <0.0001

    Overall Survival

    Number of Deaths, N (%)

    29 (22%)

    17 (26%)

    Median Overall Survival (months)

    NR

    NR

    HR (95% CI)

    0.77 (0.42, 1.41)

    Stratified Log-Rank Test P-value*,

    0.2

    Figure 2 Kaplan-Meier Curves of Progression-free Survival for Study 2

    Figure 2 Kaplan-Meier
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  • 16 HOW SUPPLIED/STORAGE AND HANDLING

    16.1 How Supplied

    Stivarga tablets are supplied in packages containing three bottles, with each bottle containing 28 tablets, for a total of 84 tablets per package (NDC 50419-171-03).

    16.2 Storage and Handling

    Store Stivarga at 25°C (77°F); excursions are permitted from 15 to 30°C (59 to 86°F) [See USP Controlled Room Temperature].

    Store tablets in the original bottle and do not remove the desiccant. Keep the bottle tightly closed after first opening.

    Discard any unused tablets 28 days after opening the bottle.Dispose of unused tablets in accordance with local requirements.

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  • 17 PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION

    See FDA-Approved Patient Labeling (Patient Information).

     
    Inform your patients of the following:
    Stivarga may cause severe or life-threatening liver damage. Inform patients that they will need to undergo monitoring for liver damage and to immediately report any signs or symptoms of severe liver damage to their health care provider.
    Stivarga can cause severe bleeding. Advise patients to contact their health care provider for any episode of bleeding.
    Stivarga can cause hand-foot skin reactions or rash elsewhere. Advise patients to contact their health care provider if they experience skin changes associated with redness, pain, blisters, bleeding, or swelling.
    Stivarga can cause or exacerbate existing hypertension. Advise patients they will need to undergo blood pressure monitoring and to contact their health care provider if blood pressure is elevated or if symptoms from hypertension occur including severe headache, lightheadedness, or neurologic symptoms.
    Stivarga increased the risk for myocardial ischemia and infarction. Advise patients to seek immediate emergency help if they experience chest pain, shortness of breath, or feel dizzy or like passing out.
    Contact a healthcare provider immediately if they experience severe pains in their abdomen, persistent swelling of the abdomen, high fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, severe diarrhea (frequent or loose bowel movements), or dehydration.
    Stivarga may complicate wound healing. Advise patients to inform their health care provider if they plan to undergo a surgical procedure or had recent surgery.
    Inform patients that regorafenib can cause fetal harm. Advise women of reproductive potential and men of the need for effective contraception during Stivarga treatment and for up to 2 months after completion of treatment. Instruct women of reproductive potential to immediately contact her health care provider if pregnancy is suspected or confirmed during or within 2 months of completing treatment with Stivarga.
    Advise nursing mothers that it is not known whether regorafenib is present in breast milk and discuss whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue regorafenib.
    Inform patients to take any missed dose on the same day, as soon as they remember, and that they must not take two doses on the same day to make up for a dose missed on the previous day.
    Inform patients to store medicine in the original container. Do not place medication in daily or weekly pill boxes . Any remaining tablets should be discarded 28 days after opening the bottle. Tightly close bottle after each opening and keep the desiccant in the bottle.
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  • Patient Package Insert

    Stivarga® (sti-VAR-gah)

    (regorafenib)

    tablets

    Read this Patient Information before you start taking Stivarga and each time you get a refill. There may be new information. This information does not take the place of talking to your healthcare provider about your medical condition or treatment.

    What is the most important information I should know about Stivarga?

    Stivarga can cause serious side effects, including:

    Liver problems. Stivarga can cause liver problems which can be serious and sometimes lead to death. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your liver function before you start taking Stivarga and during your treatment with Stivarga to check for liver problems. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get any of these symptoms of liver problems during treatment:

    yellowing of your skin or the white part of your eyes (jaundice)
    nausea or vomiting
    dark “tea-colored” urine
    change in sleep pattern

    What is Stivarga?

    Stivarga is a prescription medicine used to treat people with:

    colon or rectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body and for which they have received previous treatment with certain chemotherapy medicines

    a rare stomach, bowel, or esophagus cancer called GIST (gastrointestinal stromal tumors) that cannot be treated with surgery or that has spread to other parts of the body and for which they have received previous treatment with certain medicines

    Stivarga has not been used to treat children less than 18 years of age.

    What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking Stivarga?

    Before you take Stivarga, tell your healthcare provider if you:

    have liver problems
    have bleeding problems
    have high blood pressure
    have heart problems or chest pain
    plan to have any surgical procedures
    have any other medical conditions
    are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Stivarga can harm your unborn baby. Females and males should use effective birth control during treatment with Stivarga and for 2 months after your last dose of Stivarga. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you or your partner becomes pregnant either while taking Stivarga or within 2 months after your last dose of Stivarga.
    are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if Stivarga passes into your breast milk. You and your healthcare provider should decide if you will take Stivarga or breastfeed.

    Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins and herbal supplements. Stivarga may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect how Stivarga works.

    Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of your medicines and show it to your healthcare provider and pharmacist when you get a new medicine.

    How should I take Stivarga?

    Take Stivarga exactly as your healthcare provider tells you.
    You will usually take Stivarga 1 time a day for 21 days (3 weeks) and then stop for 7 days (1 week). This is 1 cycle of treatment. Repeat this cycle for as long as your healthcare provider tells you to.
    Swallow Stivarga tablets whole.
    Take Stivarga at the same time each day with a low-fat breakfast.
     
    Examples of a low-fat breakfast include:
    2 slices of white toast with 1 tablespoon of low-fat margarine and 1 tablespoon of jelly, and 8 ounces of skim milk (319 calories and 8.2 grams fat), or
    1 cup of cereal, 8 ounces of skim milk, 1 slice of toast with jelly, apple juice, and 1 cup of coffee or tea (520 calories and 2 grams fat).
    Your healthcare provider may stop your treatment or change the dose of your treatment if you get side effects.
    If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember on that day. Do not take two doses on the same day to make up for a missed dose.
    If you take too much Stivarga call your healthcare provider or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

    What should I avoid while taking Stivarga?

    Avoid drinking grapefruit juice and taking St. John’s Wort while taking Stivarga. These can affect the way Stivarga works.

    What are the possible side effects of Stivarga?

    Stivarga can cause serious side effects including:

    See “ What is the most important information I should know about Stivarga?
    severe bleeding. Stivarga can cause bleeding which can be serious and sometimes lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any signs of bleeding while taking Stivarga including:
    vomiting blood or if your vomit looks like coffee-grounds
    pink or brown urine
    red or black (looks like tar) stools
    coughing up blood or blood clots
    menstrual bleeding that is heavier than normal
    unusual vaginal bleeding
    nose bleeds that happen often
    a skin problem called hand-foot skin reaction and severe skin rash. Hand-foot skin reactions can cause redness, pain, blisters, bleeding, or swelling on the palms of your hands or soles of your feet. If you get this side effect or a severe skin rash, your healthcare provider may stop your treatment for some time.
    high blood pressure. Your blood pressure should be checked every week for the first 6 weeks of starting Stivarga. Your blood pressure should be checked regularly and any high blood pressure should be treated while you are receiving Stivarga. Tell your healthcare provider if you have severe headaches, lightheadedness, or changes in your vision.
    decreased blood flow to the heart and heart attack. Get emergency help right away and call your healthcare provider if you get symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, feel dizzy or feel like passing out.
    a condition called Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome (RPLS). Call your healthcare provider right away if you get: severe headaches, seizure, confusion, change in vision, or problems thinking.
    a tear in your stomach or intestinal wall (bowel perforation). Stivarga may cause a tear in your stomach or bowel perforation that can be serious and sometimes lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get:
    severe pain in your stomach-area (abdomen)
    swelling of the abdomen
    high fever
    wound healing problems. If you need to have a surgical procedure, tell your healthcare provider that you are taking Stivarga. You should stop taking Stivarga at least 2 weeks before any planned surgery.

    The most common side effects of Stivarga include:

    tiredness, weakness, fatigue
    frequent or loose bowel movements (diarrhea)
    loss of appetite
    swelling, pain and redness of the lining in your mouth, throat, stomach and bowel (mucositis)
    voice changes or hoarseness
    infection
    pain in other parts of your body
    weight loss
    nausea

    Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

    These are not all of the possible side effects of Stivarga. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist.

    Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

    How do I store Stivarga?

    Store Stivarga tablets at room temperature between 68° F to 77° F (20° C to 25° C).
    Keep Stivarga in the bottle that it comes in. Do not put Stivarga tablets in a daily or weekly pill box.
    The Stivarga bottle contains a desiccant to help keep your medicine dry. Keep the desiccant in the bottle.
    Keep the bottle of Stivarga tightly closed.
    Safely throw away (discard) any unused Stivarga tablets after 28 days of opening the bottle.

    Keep Stivarga and all medicines out of the reach of children.

    General information about Stivarga.

    Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Patient Information leaflet. Do not use Stivarga for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give Stivarga to other people even if they have the same symptoms you have. It may harm them.

    This leaflet summarizes the most important information about Stivarga. If you would like more information, talk with your healthcare provider. You can ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for information about Stivarga this is written for health professionals.

    For more information, go to www.STIVARGA-US.com or call 1-888-842-2937.

    What are the ingredients in Stivarga?

    Active ingredient: regorafenib

    Inactive ingredients: cellulose microcrystalline, croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate, povidone and colloidal silicon dioxide.

    Film coat: ferric oxide red, ferric oxide yellow, lecithin (soy), polyethylene glycol 3350, polyvinyl alcohol, talc and titanium dioxide.

    This Patient Information has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    Manufactured in Germany

    Distributed and marketed by:

    Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals Inc.

    Wayne, NJ 07470

    © 2013 Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals Inc.

    Revised: 8/2013

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  • PACKAGE/LABEL PRINCIPAL DISPLAY PANEL
  • INGREDIENTS AND APPEARANCE
    STIVARGA 
    regorafenib tablet, film coated
    Product Information
    Product Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG LABEL Item Code (Source) NDC:50419-171
    Route of Administration ORAL DEA Schedule     
    Active Ingredient/Active Moiety
    Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength
    REGORAFENIB MONOHYDRATE (REGORAFENIB) REGORAFENIB 40 mg
    Inactive Ingredients
    Ingredient Name Strength
    CELLULOSE, MICROCRYSTALLINE  
    CROSCARMELLOSE SODIUM  
    MAGNESIUM STEARATE  
    SILICON DIOXIDE  
    FERRIC OXIDE RED  
    FERRIC OXIDE YELLOW  
    LECITHIN, SOYBEAN  
    POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 3350  
    POLYVINYL ALCOHOL  
    TALC  
    TITANIUM DIOXIDE  
    POVIDONES  
    Product Characteristics
    Color PINK (light) Score no score
    Shape OVAL Size 16mm
    Flavor Imprint Code BAYER
    Contains     
    Packaging
    # Item Code Package Description Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
    1 NDC:50419-171-03 3 in 1 BOX
    1 NDC:50419-171-01 28 in 1 BOTTLE, PLASTIC; Combination Product Type = C112160
    2 NDC:50419-171-00 210 in 1 BOX
    2 28 in 1 BOTTLE; Combination Product Type = C112160
    3 NDC:50419-171-04 1 in 1 CARTON
    3 28 in 1 BOTTLE, PLASTIC; Combination Product Type = C112160
    Marketing Information
    Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
    NDA NDA203085 09/27/2012
    Labeler - Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals Inc. (005436809)
    Establishment
    Name Address ID/FEI Business Operations
    Bayer Pharma AG 341081414 MANUFACTURE(50419-171)
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